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Levi Diaz
Levi Diaz

Abortion: Opposing Viewpoints - A Resource for Students, Teachers, and Researchers on Abortion Issues



Abortion (Opposing Viewpoints) ebook rar




Abortion is one of the most divisive and contentious issues in contemporary society. It raises profound moral, legal, social, and political questions that have no easy answers. How should we think about abortion? What are the arguments for and against it? How can we resolve this debate in a respectful and constructive way?




Abortion (Opposing Viewpoints) ebook rar


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One way to approach these questions is to read Abortion: Opposing Viewpoints, a book that presents a range of perspectives on this controversial topic. This book is part of a series that aims to provide balanced and objective information on various issues by featuring essays from different authors who represent different viewpoints. The book is edited by David M. Haugen, Susan Musser, and Kacy Lovelace, who have selected and organized essays from various sources into four main sections: The morality of abortion, The legality of abortion, The responsibility for abortion, and The justification for abortion. Each section contains two opposing viewpoints that offer contrasting arguments and evidence on each aspect of abortion.


In this article, I will summarize and analyze each viewpoint presented in this book. I will also provide some critical thinking skills activities that can help you evaluate each argument and form your own opinion on this issue. Finally, I will conclude with my own perspective on where I stand on abortion.


The morality of abortion




The first section of this book deals with one of the most fundamental questions about abortion: Is it moral or immoral? This question involves ethical values and principles that guide our judgments about right and wrong. The authors in this section present two opposing viewpoints on this question: Abortion is immoral and Abortion is moral.


Abortion is immoral




The first viewpoint in this section argues that abortion is immoral because it violates the sanctity of human life. The authors of this viewpoint are mostly religious leaders and activists who base their arguments on biblical teachings, natural law, and human dignity. They claim that human life begins at conception and that every human being has a right to life that cannot be taken away by anyone. They also claim that abortion harms women and society by devaluing life, promoting selfishness, and undermining family and social bonds. They urge people to respect and protect the unborn and to support alternatives to abortion, such as adoption, abstinence, and contraception.


Some of the essays in this viewpoint are:


  • "Abortion Is a Sin Against God" by Pope John Paul II



  • "Abortion Violates the Natural Moral Law" by Patrick Lee and Robert P. George



  • "Abortion Is an Act of Violence Against Women" by Frederica Mathewes-Green



  • "Abortion Destroys the Social Fabric" by Charles Colson



Abortion is moral




The second viewpoint in this section argues that abortion is moral because it respects the autonomy of women. The authors of this viewpoint are mostly feminists, philosophers, and humanists who base their arguments on human rights, rationality, and compassion. They claim that women have a right to control their own bodies and reproductive choices and that no one else has the authority to impose their values or beliefs on them. They also claim that abortion benefits women and society by enhancing freedom, equality, health, and well-being. They urge people to support and defend the right to abortion and to oppose any attempts to restrict or ban it.


Some of the essays in this viewpoint are:


  • "Abortion Is a Woman's Right" by Patricia G. Miller



  • "Abortion Is Morally Permissible" by Mary Anne Warren



  • "Abortion Is Compassionate" by Katha Pollitt



  • "Abortion Is a Social Good" by Frances Kissling



The legality of abortion




The second section of this book deals with another important question about abortion: Should it be legal or illegal? This question involves legal rules and regulations that govern our actions and behaviors. The authors in this section present two opposing viewpoints on this question: Abortion should be illegal and Abortion should be legal.


Abortion should be illegal




The first viewpoint in this section argues that abortion should be illegal because it violates the constitutional protection of life. The authors of this viewpoint are mostly lawyers, judges, and politicians who base their arguments on the interpretation of the U.S. Constitution, especially the Fourteenth Amendment, which guarantees due process and equal protection of the law to all persons. They claim that the unborn are persons who have a right to life that cannot be denied by the government or anyone else. They also claim that legal abortion has negative consequences for society, such as increased crime, violence, corruption, and judicial activism. They urge people to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion in 1973, and to enact laws that protect the unborn at all stages of development.


Some of the essays in this viewpoint are:


  • "The Constitution Protects Unborn Life" by Robert H. Bork



  • "The Supreme Court Erred in Roe v. Wade" by Paul Benjamin Linton



  • "Legal Abortion Leads to More Crime" by John R. Lott Jr.



  • "Legal Abortion Corrupts Society" by Hadley Arkes



Abortion should be legal




The second viewpoint in this section argues that abortion should be legal because it respects the constitutional protection of privacy. The authors of this viewpoint are also mostly lawyers, judges, and politicians who base their arguments on the interpretation of the U.S. Constitution, especially the Ninth Amendment, which guarantees unenumerated rights retained by the people, and the Fourteenth Amendment, which guarantees due process and liberty to all persons. They claim that women are persons who have a right to privacy that includes the freedom to make their own reproductive decisions without interference from the government or anyone else. They also claim that legal abortion has positive consequences for society, such as reduced poverty, improved health, enhanced democracy, and judicial restraint. They urge people to uphold Roe v. Wade and to oppose any laws that restrict or ban abortion.


Some of the essays in this viewpoint are:


  • "The Constitution Protects Women's Right to Abortion" by Ruth Bader Ginsburg



```html The responsibility for abortion




The third section of this book deals with another relevant question about abortion: Who is responsible for it? This question involves social values and norms that shape our roles and relationships. The authors in this section present two opposing viewpoints on this question: Abortion is a personal choice and Abortion is a social issue.


Abortion is a personal choice




The first viewpoint in this section argues that abortion is a personal choice that should be left to the individual conscience of each woman. The authors of this viewpoint are mostly libertarians, liberals, and secularists who base their arguments on the respect for diversity, tolerance, and pluralism. They claim that people have different values and beliefs about abortion and that no one has the right to impose their views on others. They also claim that abortion is a private matter that does not concern anyone else except the woman and her doctor. They urge people to trust women to make their own decisions and to refrain from judging or interfering with them.


Some of the essays in this viewpoint are:


  • "Abortion Is a Matter of Individual Conscience" by John Stuart Mill



  • "Abortion Is a Matter of Personal Liberty" by Ronald Dworkin



  • "Abortion Is a Matter of Religious Freedom" by Americans United for Separation of Church and State



  • "Abortion Is a Matter of Medical Ethics" by Physicians for Reproductive Choice and Health



Abortion is a social issue




The second viewpoint in this section argues that abortion is a social issue that should be addressed by the collective action of society. The authors of this viewpoint are mostly conservatives, communitarians, and religious groups who base their arguments on the common good, solidarity, and dialogue. They claim that people have shared values and interests about abortion and that everyone has a stake in its consequences. They also claim that abortion is a public matter that affects not only the woman and her fetus, but also the father, the family, the community, and the society. They urge people to care for each other and to work together to find solutions that respect both life and choice.


Some of the essays in this viewpoint are:


  • "Abortion Is a Matter of Social Justice" by Cardinal Joseph Bernardin



  • "Abortion Is a Matter of Civic Responsibility" by Amitai Etzioni



  • "Abortion Is a Matter of Interfaith Dialogue" by The Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice



  • "Abortion Is a Matter of Public Health" by The Guttmacher Institute



The justification for abortion




The fourth and final section of this book deals with yet another significant question about abortion: When is it justified? This question involves practical considerations and circumstances that influence our decisions and actions. The authors in this section present two opposing viewpoints on this question: Abortion is justified in some cases and Abortion is never justified.


Abortion is justified in some cases




The first viewpoint in this section argues that abortion is justified in some cases where there are compelling reasons or exceptions that outweigh the moral or legal objections to it. The authors of this viewpoint are mostly moderates, pragmatists, and utilitarians who base their arguments on the balance of harms and benefits, the respect for diversity, and the avoidance of extremism. They claim that abortion is not always right or wrong, but depends on the context and consequences of each situation. They also claim that abortion can be morally or legally permissible in cases where there are serious threats to the life or health of the woman or the fetus, or where there are cases of rape, incest, or fetal abnormalities. They urge people to be flexible and compassionate in dealing with these difficult cases.


Some of the essays in this viewpoint are:


  • "Abortion Is Justified When the Mother's Life Is at Risk" by Judith Jarvis Thomson



  • "Abortion Is Justified When the Fetus Is Severely Impaired" by Bonnie Steinbock



  • "Abortion Is Justified When the Pregnancy Results from Rape or Incest" by Susan Sherwin



  • "Abortion Is Justified When It Benefits Society" by Peter Singer



Abortion is never justified




The second viewpoint in this section argues that abortion is never justified because there are no valid reasons or exceptions that can override the moral or legal prohibitions against it. The authors of this viewpoint are mostly radicals, idealists, and deontologists who base their arguments on the consistency of principles, the inviolability of rights, and the rejection of compromise. They claim that abortion is always wrong and unjust, regardless of the context and consequences of each situation. They also claim that abortion can never be morally or legally acceptable in any case, even when there are threats to the life or health of the woman or the fetus, or when there are cases of rape, incest, or fetal abnormalities. They urge people to be firm and courageous in defending the absolute value of human life.


Some of the essays in this viewpoint are:


  • "Abortion Is Never Justified Because It Violates the Right to Life" by Don Marquis



  • "Abortion Is Never Justified Because It Violates the Duty to Care" by Rosalind Hursthouse



  • "Abortion Is Never Justified Because It Violates the Principle of Nonviolence" by Mahatma Gandhi



  • "Abortion Is Never Justified Because It Violates the Sanctity of God's Creation" by Mother Teresa



Conclusion




In conclusion, this article has summarized and analyzed the four main sections and eight opposing viewpoints presented in the book Abortion: Opposing Viewpoints. This book offers a comprehensive and balanced overview of the various arguments and perspectives on this controversial issue. It also provides some critical thinking skills activities that can help you evaluate each argument and form your own opinion on this issue.


As for my own perspective, I find myself leaning towards the pro-choice side, but not without some reservations and qualifications. I agree that women have a right to privacy and autonomy over their own bodies and reproductive choices, and that no one else has the authority to impose their values or beliefs on them. I also agree that legal abortion has positive consequences for women and society, such as enhancing freedom, equality, health, and well-being. However, I also recognize that abortion is not a simple or easy decision, and that it involves ethical dilemmas and trade-offs. I respect that some people have different values and beliefs about abortion, and that they may have sincere and genuine reasons for opposing it. I also acknowledge that abortion has negative consequences for some women and society, such as devaluing life, promoting selfishness, and undermining family and social bonds. Therefore, I think that abortion should be legal but rare, and that it should be accompanied by adequate counseling, education, prevention, and support.


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions and answers about abortion and this book:


  • What is abortion?Abortion is the deliberate termination of a pregnancy before the fetus can survive outside the womb.



  • What are the main methods of abortion?The main methods of abortion are medical abortion (using pills or injections to induce a miscarriage) and surgical abortion (using instruments to remove the fetus from the uterus).



  • What are the main reasons for abortion?The main reasons for abortion are unplanned or unwanted pregnancy, health risks to the woman or the fetus, rape or incest, fetal abnormalities, social or economic pressures, or personal preferences.



  • What are the main risks and complications of abortion?The main risks and complications of abortion are bleeding, infection, injury to the uterus or other organs, incomplete abortion (retained tissue), ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy outside the uterus), infertility, psychological distress, guilt, regret, depression, anxiety, or post-traumatic stress disorder.



  • What are the main sources of information and support for abortion?The main sources of information and support for abortion are health care providers (doctors, nurses, counselors), family planning clinics (such as Planned Parenthood), reproductive rights organizations (such as NARAL Pro-Choice America), online resources (such as WebMD), books (such as Abortion: Opposing Viewpoints), friends, family, partners, or peers.



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